God is Love

Hosanna

Active member
“Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails” (1 Corinthians 13:4-8a). This is God’s description of love, and because God is love (1 John 4:8), this is what He is like.

I will never forget the hour when I first discovered that God was really good. It had never dawned on me that it meant He was actually and practically good, with the same kind of goodness He has commanded us to have. The expression “the goodness of God” had seemed to me nothing more than a sort of heavenly statement, which I could not be expected to understand. Then one day in my reading of the Bible I came across the words “O taste and see that the Lord is good” and suddenly they meant something. What does it mean to be good?

To be good is to do the best we know. I saw that since God has total knowledge He must know what is the best and highest good of all; therefore, His goodness must necessarily be beyond question.

I can never express what this meant to me. I had such a view of the actual goodness of God that I saw nothing could possibly go wrong under His care, and it seemed to me that no one could ever be anxious again. Over and over, when appearances have been against Him, and when I have been tempted to question whether He had been unkind or neglectful or indifferent, I have been brought up short by the words “the Lord is good.” I have seen that it was simply unthinkable that a God who was good could have done the bad things I had imagined.
 
God allowed unspeakable evils in the world—sure, God delegated authority and that authority disobeyed—but God set up the entire system, God made the rules, God allowed the framework where one sin could produce innumerable evils and sufferings.

Jesus said in this world we would have trouble, so much so, that he said to pray in preparation, to be willing to suffer enormously, and to expect this world to become even more evil towards the end of time, as they crucified him in the "green wood," the spring season spiritually.

Where we need not be anxious is in our final destiny or our own ability to overcome, as we trust in the grace of God to carry us homeward, but to think God protects all people from horrible things in this life is naivety and presumption, not trust and faith.


Although God's anger is against sin, this does not logically mean he is not loving. And although repentance, prayer and intercession are seen to turn his anger away, that's because nothing could fully absolve God's anger until it was permanently dealt with at the Cross:

whom God set forth as a propitiation by His blood, through faith, to demonstrate His righteousness, because in His forbearance God had passed over the sins that were previously committed, (Rom. 3:25 NKJ)


So let us do what Jesus said and build our house on the rock. Otherwise in times of tribulation, when God doesn't do what we "expect" him to, we will lose our faith and become offended and embittered at what God allowed to be, instead of humbly dependent on him.
 
Jesus loves me... how do I know? The Bible tells me so. When I had my first encounter with Jesus I knew right off the bat he loved me. That's his nature.

In 1 John 4:7–8, the apostle John returns to one of his favorite subjects—love: “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. He who does not love does not know God, for God is love”.

With these words, John launches an extended teaching on the importance of showing love (1 John 4:7–21). He starts by clarifying that the believer’s ability to love comes from knowing God: “Anyone who loves is a child of God and knows God” (1 John 4:8).

The idea that “love is of God” (NKJV) can also be expressed as “love is from God”) and “love comes from God” . John explains that the source of all love is the divine nature of God. Love has its origin in God because God is love by His very essence.

John’s teaching reveals why love is essential in the believer’s life. Love is the litmus test of an authentic relationship with God. If we are indeed children of God through faith in Jesus Christ, we share in His nature (2 Peter 1:4). God’s nature is love; therefore, we will exhibit love. Demonstrating Christian love confirms the reality of our spiritual life.

“No one has ever seen God,” states John, “but if we love each other, God lives in us, and his love is brought to full expression in us” (1 John 4:12, NLT). One Bible commentator defines the word love in this passage as “a consuming passion for the well-being of others, and this love has its wellspring in God” (F. F. Bruce, The Epistles of John, Eerdmans Pub., 1983). If we want to be like God, we will care deeply about the well-being of others because God is love. Love is not only who God is but what He does: “God showed how much he loved us by sending his one and only Son into the world so that we might have eternal life through him” (1 John 4:9, NLT).

Only those born of God’s Spirit can love in the fullness of its expression, which is sacrifice: “This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters” (1 John 3:16).
From Got?
 
My love is omnipresent.

Acts 17:24-28
24 “He is the God who made the world and everything in it. Since he is Lord of heaven and earth, he doesn’t live in man-made temples, 25 and human hands can’t serve his needs—for he has no needs. He himself gives life and breath to everything, and he satisfies every need. 26 From one man he created all the nations throughout the whole earth. He decided beforehand when they should rise and fall, and he determined their boundaries. 27 “His purpose was for the nations to seek after God and perhaps feel their way toward him and find him—though he is not far from any one of us. 28 For in him we live and move and exist. As some of your own poets have said, ‘We are his offspring.’ NLT



When you begin to realize that I am intimately involved in everything I have created, you will start seeing Me in some of the most unexpected places dear one. For the reality of creation itself is that I give life and breath to all things. And there is no place a person can go on this planet to flee My presence, for in Me all things consist.

Even down to the smallest molecule, the entire universe is held together through the life union I have with My Son, Jesus. For the universe doesn't contain Me, I contain the universe.

So I want you to be awakened to My manifest love that is all around you My child. For every sunrise, every rain shower, and every newborn are but a few of the tokens of My undying love to a world that desperately needs to know My nearness.
 
My love imparts everlasting joy.

Isaiah 51:11
Those who have been ransomed by the Lord will return. They will enter Jerusalem singing, crowned with everlasting joy. Sorrow and mourning will disappear, and they will be filled with joy and gladness. NLT



My joy is woven into your birthright dear child and it is the foundational response of knowing you are loved with an everlasting love. If you would simply receive it as the free gift it is, you will find yourself filled to overflowing with joy today, no matter what circumstances you face.

For My joy is not based on a self-generated emotion and is not conditional on how you are feeling. It is imparted to you, Spirit to spirit through the unbreakable life union you have with My beloved Son, Jesus. For His joy has become your joy both now and forevermore.

So take a deep breath dear one and reflect on the vastness of My eternal love for you. As you begin to realize at a deeper level just how much you are loved, My joy will flood your being. And as it does, sorrow and mourning will disappear.
 
My love imparts everlasting joy.

Isaiah 51:11
Those who have been ransomed by the Lord will return. They will enter Jerusalem singing, crowned with everlasting joy. Sorrow and mourning will disappear, and they will be filled with joy and gladness. NLT



My joy is woven into your birthright dear child and it is the foundational response of knowing you are loved with an everlasting love. If you would simply receive it as the free gift it is, you will find yourself filled to overflowing with joy today, no matter what circumstances you face.

For My joy is not based on a self-generated emotion and is not conditional on how you are feeling. It is imparted to you, Spirit to spirit through the unbreakable life union you have with My beloved Son, Jesus. For His joy has become your joy both now and forevermore.

So take a deep breath dear one and reflect on the vastness of My eternal love for you. As you begin to realize at a deeper level just how much you are loved, My joy will flood your being. And as it does, sorrow and mourning will disappear.
Yes indeed, Joy... joy... joy Whenever we put our trust in Him.
 
WHAT' S LOVE GOT TO WITH IT?


In our society, love is usually spoken of in passive terms. That is, love is something that happens to us over which we have little or no control. We “fall” in love. We speak this way chiefly because we associate love with a particular feeling or emotion. Such emotion cannot be produced by pushing a button or by a conscious act of the will. We do not “decide” to fall in love with someone.

The Bible, however, speaks of love in far more active terms. The concept of love functions more as a verb than as a noun. Love is a duty—an action we are obliged to perform. God commands us to love our neighbor, to love our spouse, and even to love our enemies. It is one thing to conjure up feelings of love and affection for one’s enemies; it is another thing to act in a loving manner toward them.

The Bible has a complex concept of love that is expressed in relatively few words. The Old Testament predominantly used one Hebrew word, aheb, to express love. The New Testament primarily used two Greek words for love—phileo and agape. Phileo, from which the city Philadelphia derives its name (meaning the “city of brotherly love”), is the Greek word that is used to denote the affection shared by friends. By contrast, the term eros, which is not used in the Bible, refers more to sexual or erotic love. It is the kind of love we often associate with romance. These two types of love are common to all human beings. These types of love have a tendency to be motivated by self-interest, self-gratification, and self-protection.

The New Testament, however, describes a third kind of love. Agape stands in contrast to the more basic affections. Its most distinguishing feature is a lack of self-interest. It proceeds out of a heart of care and concern for others. Its characteristics are enumerated by Paul in 1 Corinthians 13. Agape love is patient and kind. It neither boasts nor envies. It is not proud, rude, self-seeking, or easily angered. It is quick to forgive; it seeks the good and the true. It protects, trusts, hopes, and perseveres always. It never fails.

Biblical love is therefore more than a mere emotion. It is active. The calling of the Christian is not primarily to develop feelings of love for others. In many instances that is outside the Christian’s control. However, we can control how we respond and act toward a given person. The Christian is to be loving, to mirror the selfless love of God.

Agape love, then, is the ultimate fruit of the Spirit. As Paul wrote, “now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13).

Insofar as agape love mirrors and reflects the character of God’s love for us, it may be called a steadfast love, a love that endures with loyalty. It is characterized by fidelity—the faithfulness that is built upon trust. Such love is incapable of being fickle; it is the love of permanent commitment.

Summary
1. Biblical love is active love.
2. Biblical love is a duty commanded by God.
3. Of the various Greek words for love, three important ones need to be distinguished:
(a) phileo = brotherly affection
(b) eros = sexual or romantic love
(c) agape = godly or spiritual love
4. Agape love reflects the steadfast love of God and is oriented toward others.

Biblical passages for reflection:
Deuteronomy 6:4-5
Matthew 5:43-48
1 Corinthians 13:1-13
Ephesians 5:25-33
1 John 4:7-21


R. C. Sproul, Essential Truths of the Christian Faith
 
WHAT' S LOVE GOT TO WITH IT?


In our society, love is usually spoken of in passive terms. That is, love is something that happens to us over which we have little or no control. We “fall” in love. We speak this way chiefly because we associate love with a particular feeling or emotion. Such emotion cannot be produced by pushing a button or by a conscious act of the will. We do not “decide” to fall in love with someone.

The Bible, however, speaks of love in far more active terms. The concept of love functions more as a verb than as a noun. Love is a duty—an action we are obliged to perform. God commands us to love our neighbor, to love our spouse, and even to love our enemies. It is one thing to conjure up feelings of love and affection for one’s enemies; it is another thing to act in a loving manner toward them.

The Bible has a complex concept of love that is expressed in relatively few words. The Old Testament predominantly used one Hebrew word, aheb, to express love. The New Testament primarily used two Greek words for love—phileo and agape. Phileo, from which the city Philadelphia derives its name (meaning the “city of brotherly love”), is the Greek word that is used to denote the affection shared by friends. By contrast, the term eros, which is not used in the Bible, refers more to sexual or erotic love. It is the kind of love we often associate with romance. These two types of love are common to all human beings. These types of love have a tendency to be motivated by self-interest, self-gratification, and self-protection.

The New Testament, however, describes a third kind of love. Agape stands in contrast to the more basic affections. Its most distinguishing feature is a lack of self-interest. It proceeds out of a heart of care and concern for others. Its characteristics are enumerated by Paul in 1 Corinthians 13. Agape love is patient and kind. It neither boasts nor envies. It is not proud, rude, self-seeking, or easily angered. It is quick to forgive; it seeks the good and the true. It protects, trusts, hopes, and perseveres always. It never fails.

Biblical love is therefore more than a mere emotion. It is active. The calling of the Christian is not primarily to develop feelings of love for others. In many instances that is outside the Christian’s control. However, we can control how we respond and act toward a given person. The Christian is to be loving, to mirror the selfless love of God.

Agape love, then, is the ultimate fruit of the Spirit. As Paul wrote, “now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13).

Insofar as agape love mirrors and reflects the character of God’s love for us, it may be called a steadfast love, a love that endures with loyalty. It is characterized by fidelity—the faithfulness that is built upon trust. Such love is incapable of being fickle; it is the love of permanent commitment.

Summary
1. Biblical love is active love.
2. Biblical love is a duty commanded by God.
3. Of the various Greek words for love, three important ones need to be distinguished:
(a) phileo = brotherly affection
(b) eros = sexual or romantic love
(c) agape = godly or spiritual love
4. Agape love reflects the steadfast love of God and is oriented toward others.

Biblical passages for reflection:
Deuteronomy 6:4-5
Matthew 5:43-48
1 Corinthians 13:1-13
Ephesians 5:25-33
1 John 4:7-21


R. C. Sproul, Essential Truths of the Christian Faith
I may have to incorporate some of this into my paper. :) . A hostile witness against you know who :)
 
I don’t think so it’s the result of love and having free will to love in return. To obey God or believe satans lies and deceptions

If one of your children started raping the other right in front of you, would you allow it to honor their free will?

You would use the power you have to intervene and stop it, despite their free will, right?

It's not as simple as you are making it.
 
If one of your children started raping the other right in front of you, would you allow it to honor their free will?

You would use the power you have to intervene and stop it, despite their free will, right?

It's not as simple as you are making it.
That’s not the point. God doesn’t control out actions unless you are a determinist . Evil is a result of sin via free will. Do you put sin on a sliding scale , nice little sins vs bad ones ?
 
The "problem of evil" is very difficult to resolve with God's love.
God says, “Do this and you will overcome evil with good: Let love be genuine.” In other words: “Love must be sincere.” It must be authentic! There must be no pretense – no play acting, nothing fake or false. Let your love be the real deal.
 
God says, “Do this and you will overcome evil with good: Let love be genuine.” In other words: “Love must be sincere.” It must be authentic! There must be no pretense – no play acting, nothing fake or false. Let your love be the real deal.

And why doesn't God stop little children from being molested?

Why does God allow children to have brain cancer and ebola?

Why does God allow trillions of animals to torment and harm each other while having innumerable diseases?


Explain to me how that is loving.

Thanks.
 
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