ChatGPT — AI help with theology

dizerner

Well-known member
Can do some really cool things.

Create mock debates, outline positions, or help research theological topics.

Ask it a question here:

 
Like I say determinism is fatalism. :)


Fatalism and determinism are related philosophical concepts, but they have distinct differences in their implications and interpretations.
  1. Determinism:Determinism is the philosophical idea that all events, including human actions and choices, are causally determined by prior events and the laws of nature. It suggests that the present state of the universe, along with the natural laws that govern it, necessarily leads to specific future events. In a deterministic worldview, the future is viewed as a logical consequence of the past and the laws of cause and effect. This concept applies to both natural events and human actions.
    Difference: Determinism is a broader and more general concept, encompassing the idea that all events are causally determined. It doesn't necessarily imply a specific belief about fate or predestination. Determinism can be compatible with the idea of free will, as some philosophers propose "compatibilism," which suggests that free will can coexist with determinism if actions align with an individual's desires and motivations.
  2. Fatalism:Fatalism is the belief that all events and outcomes are predetermined and inevitable, regardless of human actions or choices. In a fatalistic view, it is futile for individuals to resist or change the course of events since they are bound to unfold as preordained. Fatalism often implies the idea of an external force or destiny that guides events in an inexorable manner.
    Difference: Fatalism is a specific subset of determinism, focusing on the inevitability of future events, typically without consideration of causality or the laws of nature. Fatalism tends to have a more fatalistic outlook, suggesting that events will unfold irrespective of human agency, choices, or actions. Unlike some interpretations of determinism, fatalism tends to reject the possibility of free will altogether.
In summary, determinism is a broader concept that suggests all events are causally determined, while fatalism is a specific subset of determinism that emphasizes the inevitability and predestination of events, often implying a lack of human control or influence over the unfolding of these events. While determinism can be compatible with free will (in the form of compatibilism), fatalism typically presents a more pessimistic view that events are fixed and beyond human intervention or choice.

Theological Determinism: This perspective holds that a divine entity or a higher power's omniscience and plan predetermine all events, including human actions.

Hard determinism is a philosophical position that asserts that free will is an illusion and that all events, including human actions and choices, are entirely determined by antecedent causes. In other words, under hard determinism, there is no room for genuine human agency or the ability to make choices that are independent of prior causes and conditions.

According to hard determinism, the state of the universe at any given moment, along with the laws of nature, logically and inevitably lead to specific outcomes in the future. This perspective denies the existence of any true alternatives and suggests that every action or decision made by an individual is the inevitable result of the sum total of their genetic makeup, past experiences, and external influences.

The proponents of hard determinism often draw on ideas from causal determinism, which posits that the world operates according to a chain of cause-and-effect relationships. They argue that even our thoughts and feelings are predetermined by physical processes in the brain and the external environment, leaving no room for genuine free will.

As a consequence of hard determinism, notions of moral responsibility and accountability become problematic. If individuals are not ultimately in control of their actions and choices, the traditional concepts of blame, punishment, and reward lose their grounding in the context of personal responsibility.

Critics of hard determinism argue that it negates the intuitive sense of agency and choice that humans experience in their everyday lives. They contend that certain complexities, such as the unpredictability of human behavior and the presence of genuine uncertainty in some systems (e.g., quantum mechanics), challenge the notion of a purely deterministic universe.
Overall, the debate between hard determinism and other philosophical perspectives on free will remains an ongoing and profound topic in philosophy and cognitive sciences, touching on fundamental questions about the nature of human existence and the limits of human autonomy.
 
ChatGPT outputs provably false information. First, it is a collation of many different sources. Those sources are not vetted and neither is the information that they contain.
Second, ChatGPT makes up content out of thin air. It outputs information that it will admit it made up in order to always seem like it is correct. I have documented screen shots where it made up what it said were peer-reviewed published documentation. When I then tried to find and verify the documentation, none of it existed. Nothing. When I then confronted it, ChatGPT admitted that each did not exist, apologized and then made up some more fake documents.
 
ChatGPT outputs provably false information. First, it is a collation of many different sources. Those sources are not vetted and neither is the information that they contain.
Second, ChatGPT makes up content out of thin air. It outputs information that it will admit it made up in order to always seem like it is correct. I have documented screen shots where it made up what it said were peer-reviewed published documentation. When I then tried to find and verify the documentation, none of it existed. Nothing. When I then confronted it, ChatGPT admitted that each did not exist, apologized and then made up some more fake documents.
Thanks for sharing !
 
Can do some really cool things.

Create mock debates, outline positions, or help research theological topics.

Ask it a question here:

Definitely not anything I would be interested in.
 
The banana is made up of many different components. The main ones would be potassium and pectin. Both highly explosive when wrapped in Dynamite.

Hamas has been making terrorist bombs out of just such bananas. The strategy is if the explosion doesn't kill you and you try to run away and slip on a banana peel you become a Sitting Duck. Film at 11:00

 
Back
Top Bottom