When reading a book, do you skip to the end?

Frank Russell

Active member
When reading a book, do you skip to the end?

A lot of theologians do this with ideas that are entirely up to God.

In the end, God will save those who he will save.

When Jesus was born, there was an expectation of someone like Him coming to bring salvation to the nation.

The theology and theologies surrounding the coming of this chosen one resulted in the nation rejecting the savior.

In the same way, people dictating what God will and will not do in the end, may result in them missing out, and hearing the refrain "I never knew you."

Yet, after the lake of fire, the one on the throne said he is making all things new. So it's hard to see from this stand point, but God sees it all clearly.
 
When reading a book, do you skip to the end?

Never.

A lot of theologians do this with ideas that are entirely up to God.

In the end, God will save those who he will save.

When Jesus was born, there was an expectation of someone like Him coming to bring salvation to the nation.

The theology and theologies surrounding the coming of this chosen one resulted in the nation rejecting the savior.

In the same way, people dictating what God will and will not do in the end, may result in them missing out, and hearing the refrain "I never knew you."

Yet, after the lake of fire, the one on the throne said he is making all things new. So it's hard to see from this stand point, but God sees it all clearly.

Do you think that the restoration will include those who are consumed in the lake of fire? Are you an advocate of universalism?
 
When reading a book, do you skip to the end?
If anyone does that, then I'd recommend reading Brandon Sanderson's book series on Alcatraz vs. the Evil Librarians.

A lot of theologians do this with ideas that are entirely up to God.

In the end, God will save those who he will save.

When Jesus was born, there was an expectation of someone like Him coming to bring salvation to the nation.

The theology and theologies surrounding the coming of this chosen one resulted in the nation rejecting the savior.

In the same way, people dictating what God will and will not do in the end, may result in them missing out, and hearing the refrain "I never knew you."

Yet, after the lake of fire, the one on the throne said he is making all things new. So it's hard to see from this stand point, but God sees it all clearly.
While we can misunderstand God's word, theologies surrounding the coming of the Savior also allowed us to recognize him, so God's word has been given because there is valuable information that God wants us to know.

The way to know God is by having the experience of expressing aspects of His nature in obedience to His law. The Father has made His will known through what He has commanded in His law, and in Matthew 7:21-23, Jesus said that only those who do the will of the Father will enter the Kingdom of Heaven in contrast with saying that he would tell those who are workers of lawlessness to depart from him because he never knew them. According to Genesis 18:19, God's way is the way that He expresses aspects of His nature such as righteousness and justice, in Exodus 33:13, Moses wanted God to be gracious to him by teaching him to walk in His way that he might know Him and Israel too, and in 1 Kings 2:1-3, God taught how to walk in His way through His law. In Jeremiah 9:3 and 9:6, they did not know God and refused to know Him because in 9:13, they had forsaken God's law, while in 9:24, those who know God know that He delights in practicing steadfast love, justice, and righteousness in all the earth, so delighting in practicing those and other aspects of God's nature is the way to know Him, and the way to know Jesus, who is the exact image of God's nature (Hebrews 1:3). Furthermore, in 1 John 2:4, those who say that they know Jesus, but don't obey his commands are liars, and in 1 John 3:4-6, those who continue to practice sin in transgression of God's law have neither seen nor known Him. So knowing God and Jesus through experience His nature is the goal of the law, which is eternal life (John 17:3), which is also way he said that obeying God's law is the way to enter eternal life (Matthew 19:17, Luke 10:25-28).
 
Do you think that the restoration will include those who are consumed in the lake of fire? Are you an advocate of universalism?
I don't see annihilation of the creations in the lake of fire as a valid doctrine, so they would need to be restored since that's what God does at that point in the time line.
 
When reading a book, do you skip to the end?
I remember a movie character .... Billy Crystal, in the movie- When Harry Met Sally.... who did that. His reasoning was pretty straightforward.... he wanted to know the ending, in case he died before he could finish the book.

A lot of theologians do this with ideas that are entirely up to God.

In the end, God will save those who he will save.
Yeah, but does God say who those people are, as far as... does he give us a basis to know if we can be saved?
When Jesus was born, there was an expectation of someone like Him coming to bring salvation to the nation.

The theology and theologies surrounding the coming of this chosen one resulted in the nation rejecting the savior.

In the same way, people dictating what God will and will not do in the end, may result in them missing out, and hearing the refrain "I never knew you."

Yet, after the lake of fire, the one on the throne said he is making all things new. So it's hard to see from this stand point, but God sees it all clearly.
So, what do you think Jesus is saying when he says he makes all things new?
 
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